Children's Ministry
Influence Those Above You
Learn how to lead up.
Store Code: CM11
Format: Word Document Premium Content - Click for info
Price: $9.95






Overview

Leading can be thought of as making things happen. When you lead down you have the ability to make things happen; when you lead across you influence peers to make things happen; leading up is influencing people above you to make things happen. The last type of leading seems the most difficult, but it doesn't have to be. This handout will help you deal in a positive way with those above you by helping you identify whom you most need to influence, how to prepare to be an influence, and what specific tools you need to influence those above you.

This tool is adapted from "Leading Up," a PromiseLand Conference workshop by David Staal. PromiseLand is a ministry of the Willow Creek Association.

This Resource contains all of the following:

Identify Whom You Want to Influence
Recognize those who will most be able to help you.

Lay Groundwork Before Approaching Those Above You
To influence those above you, you must establish a firm foot of credibility.

Four Ways to Influence Those Above You
These suggestions will help you communicate effectively with those over you.

Putting Together a Proposal
Develop a plan of action and present it to your church’s senior leaders.


Join Now

Also of Interest
Working in Team Ministry
Help your teams work together for maximum impact.

Preaching for the Lay Leader





Planting Without Reaping
Three experts offer help for a church that has worked hard without harvest.

The Health Sequence
Five questions, asked in the right order, will boost your church's vitality.

Topics:Children's ministry, Development, Empowerment, Leadership, Mentoring, Volunteer care, Volunteers
Filters:Children's ministry, Children's pastor, Discipleship, Pastor, Sunday school
References:Luke 18:16, 2 Timothy 2:2
share this pageshare this page


User Reviews

Average User Rating: Not rated

No comments

Submit Your Rating and Review *

Low

High

1000 character limit

* Comments may be edited for tone and clarity.



Member Center
Log in


Meet Our Editorial Advisors

More from Christianity Today